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When Gratitude Doesn’t Come Easy

November 5, 2018

when gratitude doesn't come easy

when gratitude doesn't come easy

 

 

 

Here in America, we are used to hearing that “we have much to be thankful for.” And it is true. As Americans, we get the privilege to enjoy a life that many in other countries can only dream of and yearn for. You would be hard-pressed to find someone who wouldn’t agree with you that we have much to be grateful for.

 

So why do so many of us struggle with gratitude?

 

As depression, anxiety, burnout and other gratitude-killers continue their meteoric rise in our society, the issue begins to become more apparent. We would all love to wake up every morning and lift our hands to the Lord, listing out everything we are so incredibly thankful for. Our inability to make this a daily habit is not an indicator that we aren’t grateful to God for what He has done for us. Rather, being unable to find something for which to be grateful each day is a sign that we have overcomplicated gratitude.

 

“See that no one repays anyone evil for evil, but always seek to do good to one another and to everyone. Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.” 1 Thessalonians 5:15-18

 

If you wait around for gratitude to wave its arms and point wildly at something for which you should be thankful, you’re going to have a hard time finding it. Our sin nature and our self-centered tendencies tend to skew our view of gratitude and what we should be grateful for. Who shows gratitude for waking up? Who says they’re thankful for the water running out of their faucet? Who looks up to heaven with a smile and thanks God for a thunderstorm in the middle of sunny summer?

 

Those who have learned to spot the beauty and gifts living in every day we have on this earth. That’s who.

 

Join us this month as we discuss gratitude, but maybe with a different approach than you are used to. We will hear from women who struggled — with infertility, job loss, and physical trials — and reached the other side with only words of gratitude for what they endured. We will work to see gratitude not as something that must be given but as something we get the chance to give. Gratitude is more than just an exercise in thanksgiving; it is a way to keep ourselves from sinking into dark times indefinitely and instead focus our minds and our hearts on the gifts of light waiting for us each day.

 

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2 responses to “When Gratitude Doesn’t Come Easy”

  1. Debbie C. says:

    It is difficult in times of great loss to have gratitude when this world has taken away so much: Mine – the loss of my husband who was my best friend for nearly 35 years. Also his family was like my family for those years and they are gone as well!
    I have learned to thank God for the small things… Then before I know it the small things actually become big things-
    friends to be with on special occasions, my full time job, my church community, volunteer community. These have become my family to me.
    Thankful for the really big things- Knowing my husband is in heaven and that I will be there when it is my time to leave this earth.
    Also that I have a Heavenly Father that truly loves me especially in the waves of loss He is my anchor… Eternally Grateful!
    Debbie C.

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